Evidence-based policy making

IZA World of Labor is an online platform that provides policy analysts, journalists, academics and society generally with relevant and concise information on labor market issues. Based on the latest research, it provides current thinking on labor markets worldwide in a clear and accessible style. IZA World of Labor aims to support evidence-based policy making and increase awareness of labor market issues.

featured article

Intergenerational return to human capital

Better educated parents invest more time and money in their children, who are more successful in the labor market

Paul J. Devereux

Governments invest a lot of money in education, so it is important to understand the benefits of this spending. One essential aspect is that education can potentially make people better parents and thus improve the educational and employment outcomes of their children. Interventions that encourage the educational attainment of children from poorer families will reduce inequality in current and future generations. In addition to purely formal education, much less expensive interventions to improve parenting skills, such as parental involvement programs in schools, may also improve child development.

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  • Intergenerational income persistence

    Measures of intergenerational persistence can be indicative of equality of opportunity, but the relationship is not clear-cut

    Jo Blanden, January 2019
    A strong association between incomes across generations—with children from poor families likely to be poor as adults—is frequently considered an indicator of insufficient equality of opportunity. Studies of such “intergenerational persistence,” or lack of intergenerational mobility, measure the strength of the relationship between parents’ socio-economic status and that of their children as adults. However, the association between equality of opportunity and common measures of intergenerational persistence is not as clear-cut as is often assumed. To aid interpretation researchers often compare measures across time and space but must recognize that reliable measurement requires overcoming important data and methodological difficulties.
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  • Bosses matter: The effects of managers on workers’ performance

    What evidence exists on whether bad bosses damage workers’ performance, or good bosses enhance it?

    Kathryn L. Shaw, January 2019
    A good boss can have a substantial positive effect on the productivity of a typical worker. While much has been written about the peer effects of working with good peers, the effects of working with good bosses appear much more substantial. A good boss can enhance the performance of their employees and can lower the quit rate. This may also be relevant in situations where it is challenging to employ incentive pay structures, such as when quality is difficult to observe. As such, firms should invest sufficiently in the hiring of good bosses with skills that are appropriate to their role.
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  • Labor market consequences of the college boom around the world

    Better information on university quality may reduce underemployment and overeducation in developing countries

    As the number of secondary school graduates rises, many developing countries expand the supply of public and private universities or face pressure to do so. However, several factors point to the need for caution, including weak job markets, low-quality university programs, and job–education mismatches. More university graduates in this context could exacerbate unemployment, underemployment, and overeducation of professionals. Whether governments should regulate the quantity or quality of university programs, however, depends on the specific combination of factors in each country.
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  • Female labor force participation and development

    Improving outcomes for women takes more than raising labor force participation—good jobs are important too

    Sher Verick, December 2018
    The relationship between female labor force participation and economic development is far more complex than often portrayed in both the academic literature and policy debates. Due to various economic and social factors, such as the pattern of growth, education attainment, and social norms, trends in female labor force participation do not conform consistently with the notion of a U-shaped relationship with GDP. Beyond participation rates, policymakers need to focus on improving women’s access to quality employment.
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  • Feb 12, 2019 - Feb 14, 2019

    AIRAANZ Conferences 2019 - Global Work, Quality Work

    Melbourne, Australia

    The 33rd annual conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ) will be hosted by the School of Management at RMIT University, Melbourne.

  • Apr 12, 2019 - Apr 13, 2019

    3rd IZA Workshop on Gender and Family Economics, Joint with Universidad Adolfo Ibañez

    Viña del Mar, Chile

    IZA and Universidad Adolfo Ibañez are organizing the 3rd IZA Annual Workshop on Gender and Family Economics. The workshop will create a stimulating environment that will enable participants to engage in discussion and receive valuable feedback on pressing issues in gender- and family-related research and policy. 

  • May 16, 2019 - May 17, 2019

    9th ifo Dresden Workshop on Labor Economics and Social Policy

    Dresden, Germany

    The workshop aims to facilitate the networking of young scientists and to promote the exchange of their latest research across the range of labour economics, social policy, education economics, demography and migration. Policy relevant contributions, either theoretical or applied, are highly welcome. We particularly encourage PhD students to submit their latest research.

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