Evidence-based policy making

IZA World of Labor is an online platform that provides policy analysts, journalists, academics and society generally with relevant and concise information on labor market issues. Based on the latest research, it provides current thinking on labor markets worldwide in a clear and accessible style. IZA World of Labor aims to support evidence-based policy making and increase awareness of labor market issues.

featured article

Poverty persistence and poverty dynamics

Snapshots of who is poor in one period provide an incomplete picture of poverty

Martin Biewen

A considerable part of the poverty that is measured in a single period is transitory rather than persistent. In most countries, only a portion of people who are currently poor are persistently poor. People who are persistently poor or who cycle into and out of poverty should be the main focus of anti-poverty policies. Understanding the characteristics of the persistently poor, and the circumstances and mechanisms associated with entry into and exit from poverty, can help to inform governments about options to reduce persistent poverty. Differences in poverty persistence across countries can shed additional light on possible sources of poverty persistence.

MoreLess
  • The labor market in Canada, 2000–2016

    A strong resource boom that benefited Canada’s economy and labor market was followed by a painful adjustment

    W. Craig Riddell, April 2018
    During the 2000–2016 period, Canada’s economy and labor market performed well. An important element in this success was the strong resource boom that lasted from the late 1990s to 2014. Since that time the economy and labor market have been undergoing a painful adjustment, a process that is now essentially complete. A good rule of thumb when examining many aspects of the labor market, such as the extent of unionization and the level of the minimum wage relative to the median wage, is that Canada is situated roughly halfway between the US and Europe.
    MoreLess
  • Aggregate labor productivity

    Labor productivity is generally seen as bringing wealth and prosperity; but how does it vary over the business cycle?

    Michael C. Burda, April 2018
    Aggregate labor productivity is a central indicator of an economy’s economic development and a wellspring of living standards. Somewhat controversially, many macroeconomists see productivity as a primary driver of fluctuations in economic activity along the business cycle. In some countries, the cyclical behavior of labor productivity seems to have changed. In the past 20–30 years, the US has become markedly less procyclical, while the rest of the OECD has not changed or productivity has become even more procyclical. Finding a cogent and coherent explanation of these developments is challenging.
    MoreLess
  • The labor market in New Zealand, 2000–2017

    Employment has grown steadily and the gender gap and skill premiums have fallen

    David C. Maré, April 2018
    New Zealand is a small open economy, with large international labor flows and skilled immigrants. Since 2000, employment growth has kept pace with strong migration-related population growth. While overall employment rates have remained relatively stable, they have increased substantially for older workers. In contrast, younger workers as well as the Maori and Pasifika ethnic groups experienced a sharp decline in employment rates and a rise in unemployment around the time of the global financial crisis. Wage gains have been modest and there has been a compression of earnings differentials by gender as well as by skill.
    MoreLess
  • Working in family firms

    Family firms offer higher job security but lower wages than other firms

    Thomas Breda, April 2018
    Family firms are ubiquitous in most countries. The differences in objectives, governance, and management styles between those firms and their non-family counterparts have several implications for the workforce, which scholars have only recently started to investigate. Family firms offer greater job security, employ different management practices, have a comparative advantage to avoid conflicts when employment relations are more hostile, and provide insurance to workers through implicit contracts when labor market regulation is limited. But all this also comes at a cost.
    MoreLess
show more
show more
  • May 02, 2018 - May 03, 2018

    International Labour Organization: Innovations for Decent Jobs for Youth

    Room XI, ILO, 4 route des Morillons, Geneva, Switzerland

    The event will provide a global platform for governments, social partners, youth and civil society, the private sector, UN entities and beyond to foster collaboration on Decent Jobs for Youth under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  • May 03, 2018 - May 06, 2018

    17th IZA/SOLE Transatlantic Meeting of Labor Economists (TAM) - Call for papers

    Buch/Amersee

    We are pleased to announce the organization of the Seventeenth IZA/SOLE Transatlantic Meeting of Labor Economists to be held at the Ammersee Conference Center in Bavaria

  • May 14, 2018

    Bank of England: Gender and Career Progression

    Bank of England

    The Bank of England, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the European Central Bank are organizing a conference on Gender and career progression, with a focus on issues specific to finance, economics, and central banks, to be held on May 14, 2018 at the Bank of England.  Governor Mark Carney (Bank of England) will provide opening remarks, and Dr. Brian Bell will be giving a keynote speech.

show more