Evidence-based policy making

IZA World of Labor is an online platform that provides policy analysts, journalists, academics and society generally with relevant and concise information on labor market issues. Based on the latest research, it provides current thinking on labor markets worldwide in a clear and accessible style. IZA World of Labor aims to support evidence-based policy making and increase awareness of labor market issues.

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Unemployment benefits and unemployment

The challenge of unemployment benefits is to protect workers while minimizing undesirable side effects

Robert Moffitt

All developed economies have unemployment benefit programs to protect workers against major income losses during spells of unemployment. By enabling unemployed workers to meet basic consumption needs, the programs protect workers from having to sell their assets or accept jobs below their qualifications. The programs also help stabilize the economy during recessions. If benefits are too generous, however, the programs can lengthen unemployment and raise the unemployment rate. The policy challenge is to protect workers while minimizing undesirable side effects.

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  • Central exit exams improve student outcomes

    External school leaving exams raise student achievement and improve how grades are understood in the labor market

    Ludger Woessmann, January 2018
    Reaching the policy goal of improving student achieve­ment by adding resources to the school system has often proven elusive. By contrast, ample evidence indicates that central exit exams constitute an important feature of a school system’s institutional framework, which can hold students, teachers, schools, and administrators accountable for student outcomes. While critics point to issues such as teaching test-only skills, which may leave students ill-prepared for the real world, the evidence does not bear this out. Overall, central exams are related to better student achievement, favorable labor market outcomes, and higher economic growth.
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  • The labor market in the Netherlands, 2001–2016

    Overall, employment and wages were accompanied by a rise in part-time work and a decline in job security

    The Netherlands is an example of a highly institutionalized labor market that places considerable attention on equity concerns. The government and social partners (unions and industry associations) seek to adjust labor market arrangements to meet the challenges of increased international competition, stronger claims on labor market positions by women, and the growing population share of immigrants and their children. The most notable developments since 2001 are the significant rise in part-time and flexible work arrangements as well as rising inequalities.
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  • The labor market in Israel, 2000–2016

    Unlike most OECD countries, Israel experienced a major increase in both employment and participation rates over the last 15 years

    Tali LaromOsnat Lifshitz, January 2018
    Following a decline in employment and participation rates during the 1980s and 1990s, Israel managed to reverse these trends during the last 15 years. This was accompanied by a substantial decrease in unemployment. New labor force participants are mostly from the low end of the education distribution, and many are relatively old. They entered the labor force in response to cuts in welfare payments and increases in the mandatory retirement age. Net household income for all population groups has increased due to growth in labor income; however, inequality between households has increased.
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  • Economic effects of differences in dialect

    Dialects show regional cultural variation, making the idea of standardized national labor markets misleading

    Jens Suedekum, January 2018
    Countries are not perfectly integrated market areas. Even if institutional differences are much smaller within than between countries, there are persistent local cultural differences. These differences act as barriers that reduce economic exchange: bilateral migration, trade, and knowledge diffusion flows are smaller, and individuals discriminate against unfamiliar dialects. They also act as natural limits to the degree of integration of a labor market, and they cannot (and perhaps should not) be easily affected by policy. Local dialects, shaped over centuries, provide a unique opportunity to measure these barriers.
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  • Feb 15, 2018 - Feb 16, 2018

    2018 Henderson Conference

    Melbourne, Australia

    The 2018 Henderson Conference commemorates the 50th anniversary of Professor Ronald Henderson's pivotal work on poverty in Australia. How has our social security system changed since then?

  • Mar 11, 2018 - Mar 13, 2018

    Rigorous Impact Evaluation in Europe - Call for papers

    Torino, Italy

    The International Network for Social Policy Teaching and Research, the University of Maryland, and Evaluation Review will cosponsor a conference on rigorous impact evaluation in Europe. The conference will be held in Torino, Italy, beginning with a dinner on Sunday, March 11 and concluding on Tuesday, March 13.

  • Apr 05, 2018 - Apr 06, 2018

    Call for papers: Technological Innovation and the future of work: emerging aspects worldwide

    Santiago de Compostela, Spain

    CIELO Laboral has launched a global initiative to study the Future of Work, inviting the Member States to undertake dialogues regarding the future of work at national level

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