Press releases

Press releases

IZA World of Labor is a global, freely available online resource that provides policymakers, academics, journalists, and researchers, with clear, concise and evidence-based knowledge on labor economics issues worldwide. The site offers relevant and succinctly information on topics including diversity, migration, minimum wage, youth unemployment, employment protection, development, education, gender balance, labor mobility and flexibility among others - for information by topic see our Key Topics pages. The concise article format with easy-to-find recommendations provides journalists with the information they need for quick research.

IZA World of Labor authors are happy to speak to the press about their research. If you have an enquiry about a labor market issue, please search our spokesperson database to find and directly contact a relevant spokesperson.

We issue frequent press releases for newly published articles and commentaries. To sign up to receive press releases, journalists should email our publisher.

  • June 29, 2015

    New report: Physically attractive people earn 15% more than plainer colleagues

    A new report by economist Eva Sierminska, just published on IZA World of Labor, shows that good-looking people earn higher wages than those who are less attractive.
    A new report by economist Eva Sierminska, just published on IZA World of Labor, shows that good-looking people earn higher wages than those who are less attractive.
  • June 18, 2015

    New Report: Performance-related-pay for teachers could improve education system

    A new report by economist Scott Imberman published today on IZA World of Labor shows that well-designed performance-related-pay (PRP) schemes for teachers can effectively improve student performance. The report states that teacher credentials and experience have little impact on student performance, so pay should no longer be determined by these factors.
    A new report by economist Scott Imberman published today on IZA World of Labor shows that well-designed performance-related-pay (PRP) schemes for teachers can effectively improve student performance. The report states that teacher credentials and experience have little impact on student performance, so pay should no longer be determined by these factors.