Authors

David Madden

  • Current position:
    Professor, School of Economics, University College Dublin
  • Positions/functions as policy advisor:
    Advisor, Department of Health, Health Impact Assessment Group on Taxation of Sugar Sweetened Beverages
  • Research interest:
    Public policy, particularly in the areas of health economics and income distribution
  • Website:
    http://www.ucd.ie/research/people/economics/professordavidmadden/
  • Affiliations:
    University College Dublin, Ireland
  • Qualifications:
    PhD Economics, University College Dublin, 1995
  • Personal statement about IZA World of Labor:
    I am very pleased to contribute to the IZA World of Labor project. This will become an important and useful resource for academics, students, and policymakers
  • Selected publications:
    • “Health and wealth on the roller-coaster: Ireland, 2003–2011.” Social Indicators Research 121:2 (2015): 387–412.
    • “The poverty effects of a ‘fat-tax' in Ireland.” Health Economics 24 (2015): 104–121.
    • “Dominance and the measurement of inequality.” In: Culyer, A. J. (ed.). Encyclopedia of Health Economics. London: Elsevier, 2014.
    • “A profile of obesity in Ireland, 2002–2007.” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society 175:4 (2012): 893–914.
  • Articles

Do schooling reforms improve long-term health?

It is difficult to find consistent evidence that schooling reforms provide health benefits

October 2016

10.15185/izawol.306 306

by David Madden Madden, D

A statistical association between more education and better health outcomes has long been observed, but in the absence of experimental data researchers have struggled to find a causal effect. Schooling reforms such as raising school leaving age, which have been enacted in many countries, can be viewed as a form of natural experiment and provide a possible method of identifying such an effect. However, the balance of evidence so far is that these reforms have had little impact on long-term health. Thus, policymakers should be cautious before anticipating a health effect when introducing reforms of this nature.