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What is Brexit?

On June 23, 2016, Britain voted to leave the EU sending shockwaves throughout the world. The UK triggered its exit from the EU on March 29, 2017 creating uncertainty about its future relationship with the Union. Any deal agreed with the EU will have a significant impact on the UK labor market as UK employment laws currently have to comply with the EU. Furthermore, any restrictions to freedom of movement with the EU could diminish the talent pool available to employers. Read articles about the issues surrounding the vote to leave as well as the latest Brexit news and opinions.

  • International trade regulation and job creation

    Trade policy is not an employment policy and should not be expected to have major effects on overall employment

    L. Alan Winters, September 2014
    Trade regulation can create jobs in the sectors it protects or promotes, but almost always at the expense of destroying a roughly equivalent number elsewhere in the economy. At a product-specific or micro level and in the short term, controlling trade could reduce the offending imports and save jobs, but for the economy as a whole and in the long term, this position has neither theoretical support nor empirical evidence in its favor. Given that protection may have other—usually adverse—effects, understanding the difficulties in using it to manage employment is important for economic policy.
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  • The impact of migration on trade

    Immigrants are good for trade

    Murat Genç, June 2014
    International trade and migration are two important dimensions of globalization. Although governments have been very willing to open their borders to trade, they have not been so liberal in their immigration policies. It has been suggested, however, that a causal positive link might exist between immigration and trade. Could governments further increase international trade by also opening their doors to immigrants? If they could, does it matter what type of immigrants are encouraged? And is there a saturation level of immigrants after which this positive impact disappears?
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  • Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?

    Migrants rarely take native workers’ jobs, and they boost employment effects in the long term

    Amelie F. Constant, May 2014
    Neither public opinion nor evidence-based research supports the claim of some politicians and the media that immigrants take the jobs of native-born workers. Public opinion polls in six migrant-destination countries after the 2008–2009 recession show that most people believe that immigrants fill job vacancies and many believe that they create jobs and do not take jobs from native workers. This view is corroborated by evidence-based research showing that immigrants—of all skill levels—do not significantly affect native employment in the short term and boost employment in the long term.
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  • Using a point system for selecting immigrants

    A point system can select economically desirable immigrants but it cannot prevent poor labor outcomes for immigrants

    Massimiliano Tani, May 2014
    Restricting immigration to young and skilled immigrants using a point system, as in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, succeeds in selecting economically desirable immigrants and provides orderly management of population growth. But the point system cannot fix short-term skilled labor shortages in a timely manner nor prevent poor labor market outcomes for immigrants, since domestic employers can undervalue schooling and work experience acquired abroad. Furthermore, the efficacy of a point system can be compromised if unscreened visa categories receive higher priority.
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  • Do immigrant workers depress the wages of native workers?

    Short-term wage effects of immigrants are close to zero—and in the long term immigrants can boost productivity and wages

    Giovanni Peri, May 2014
    Politicians, the media, and the public express concern that immigrants depress wages by competing with native workers, but 30 years of empirical research provide little supporting evidence to this claim. Most studies for industrialized countries have found no effect on wages, on average, and only modest effects on wage differentials between more and less educated immigrant and native workers. Native workers’ wages have been insulated by differences in skills, adjustments in local demand and technology, production expansion, and specialization of native workers as immigration rises.
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